Bok Choy

Bok Choy

What is it and What is it and what do I do with it?

Bok Choy is in the brassica family. With 149% of the RDA of Vitamin A as well as Vitamin C, K, and B-complex this is a powerhouse in comparison to Chinese Cabbage, including even more minerals, antioxidants (boasting six in total), and phytonutrients. The top portion can be used like lettuce in sandwiches and salads. The base ribs are great in slaws and for pickling. The entire plant goes well in soups and stir frys.

Storage

It is best refrigerated in higher humidity and eaten within 3-4 days. It should be eaten soon if the green tops turn yellow or become wilted and soft. If this does happen, just trim away the discolored or mushy parts. The ribs will generally keep longer, especially if the base is intact.

Preparation

Trim off about a quarter inch at the base. With ribs separated, wash each rib to remove any dirt. A light scrub with a vegetable brush works well. Like Chinese cabbage, the top leaves and the ribs should be separated as cooking time is different.

Recipes

6 thoughts on “Bok Choy

  • Edwardo Fuentes

    Try to use the Bok Choy leaves as soon as possible. They dry out the fastest in your fridge. I like to shred them and to salad greens.
    They white ribs can hold a bit longer until your ready to work with them.

    • Bruce Jones

      Thanks, Eduardo. Inspired by your salad suggestion last night I threw together fried rice with kale, bok choy ribs, and kohlrabi stems. I reserved the latter two leaves for small fried rice wraps. Mmm.

  • Jennifer Stork

    We had a delicious bok choy salad for dinner tonight. I found it on allrecipes.com – “Yummy Bok Choy Salad.”

    In a glass jar with a lid, mix together 1/2 c. olive oil, 1/4 c. white vinegar, 1/3 c. white sugar and 3 T. soy sauce. Shake until well mixed.

    Combine 2 bunches baby bok choy, cleaned and sliced (I used one of the beautiful ones we got from pick up this week,) 1 bunch chopped green onions (I used carrots instead), 1/8 c. toasted slivered almonds, and 1/2 (6 ounce) package chow mien noodles in a salad bowl. Toss with dressing and serve.

  • Melissa Roessing

    I cut off the white stalks of the bok choy and we’re eating them for lunch w/ peanut butter and raisins. Or you could use them to dip in hummus. Though bok choy tastes different than celery, it has the same crispness and I use it in place of celery sometimes.

  • Karen Pearson

    Bok Choy is great chopped up in a simple stir fry. I started with some onion and garlic and then added some chunks of caulifolower, carrots and asparagas. Then near the end, I added the bok choy (chopped stems and leaves) and let it cook for just one minute more to gently wilt the leaves. I added a splash of soy sauce and ginger and we ate it over noodles. Delicious and took about 20 minutes.

  • Jennifer Wolthuis

    Just made The Pioneer Woman’s Asian Noodle Salad (http://thepioneerwoman.com/cooking/2008/03/my_most_favorite_salad_ever_ever_ever_ever/). It was so fresh and yummy. I left out the other greens and just used a ton of finely chopped bok choy/chinese cabbage. I substituted soba noodles because they are delicious. Will definitely be making this one again!

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