The New Fast Food

Objective

To feed the hungry in our area with food that is healthy, tasty and grown in ways that steward creation while encouraging the home economy of cooking in the kitchen.

Overview

The New Fast Food is an innovative approach to feeding the hungry in our community. Instead of donating a random variety of vegetables, we are attempting to tackle key obstacles recipients face when receiving produce. Access to quality produce is one problem, but often times knowing what to do with the produce is the bigger problem. For a variety of complex reasons, preparing food has become difficult and intimidating for many people and, as a result, unhealthy processed foods that are ready made and convenient are the staples of most diets.

The New Fast Food promotes eating quality food that tastes great with only minimal time invested in the kitchen. Our strategy is to offer the New Fast Food bags to recipients at partnering pantries which will include all the produce (and other ingredients) needed for a particular dish along with a QR Code that can be scanned to bring one to an instructional video on how to prepare the dish. Paper recipe cards will also come with the bag. So, for instance, in June and July, The New Fast Food bundles all the needed ingredients to prepare a stir-fry. This includes bok choy or broccoli, green onions, bell peppers, peas or green beans from the farm, along with ramen noodles and peanut butter from the pantries, and the apple cider vinegar, oil, cayenne pepper, sugar and salt that we purchase and package in the bag. In August and September the dish is a fresh rainbow salsa made up of tomatoes, a red, an orange, purple and green pepper, an optional jalapeno, onions, garlic, cilantro, limes and a can of black beans.

These bags are distributed through partnerships with local organizations that have history of serving those in our community. Eighth Day Farm is collaborating with Community Action House, Center for Women in Transition, Good Samaritan Ministries, Breakfast with Baby, St. Vincent’s pantry, an the Mobile Food Pantry. We plan to distribute over 2,500 meals in 2017. All the produce will be grown at the Growth Center site at 709 Pine Avenue in Holland, MI.

The New Fast Food bags go beyond simply feeding the hungry, they also contribute to preventative health care, and stewardship of the earth!

Become a Sustaining Member

We are looking for 500 people to become monthly supporters at just $5/month to fight hunger with health! Please consider making a difference by joining today as a sustaining member.

The New Fast Food is…

1. Convenient, easy to prepare!

With the New Fast Food you don’t have to be a foodie figuring out what to do with the kohlrabi and laboring for hours in the kitchen. All the food needed is pre-bundled! The recipes are simple and straightforward, and the food comes with a QR Code so recipients can watch instructional videos on how to prepare the fresh box meal.

2. Tasty!

The New Fast Food bags are designed to appeal to everyone, striking a balance of familiar flavors while incorporating large amounts of produce.

3. Extremely healthy!

We believe shifting the conversation to preventive health care is long overdue. Our current diet is the primary cause of diabetes, heart disease and various cancers. It makes sense to change our habits and avoid these costly diseases in the first place.

4. Good for the earth!

This food is grown sustainably without chemicals and in respect of our native seasons. We seek to go beyond organic methodology, incorporating bio-intensively principles.

5. Ultra fresh!

Locally grown and delivered to the pantry within 24 hours of harvesting. A number of veggies lose nutritional value (not to mention flavor) the longer they sit on the shelf.

6. A collaborative effort!

Through our partnership with local pantries, we utilize some items they receive lots of in these dishes. Examples include ramen noodles, peanut butter, and black beans.

7. Always striving to improve!

We hope for this to become a year round program in the future, offering local produce when it is hardest to find, in the dead of winter.